Category Archives: Large Format

Large Format, Places

Shooting Milton Keynes at 50 with a Linhhof 2×3

A few weeks back I was sent on assignment to Milton Keynes to record the town on its 50th birthday.

The idea was to take a 50-year-old camera and use it to chart the changes in the town’s 50 years.

Turned out there was one problem. Fifty years ago, Milton Keynes agreed in principle. It was not built – as the saying about Rome goes – in a day. Rather, it has evolved over the decades into our present and will on into the future.

So but for a small handful of images, there were not really any before and afters to be had.

This changed the resulting feature significantly, as you can see here.

A few people have asked to see how the images look up close (they were scanned in using an Epson flat bed scanner). So, for anybody who cares, here you are! Shot on Kodak Ektar 120 roll film and with a Schneider Kreuznach 65mm f/8 lens, tripod mounted.

Underpass in Milton Keynes

Underpass in Milton Keynes

School in Milton Keynes

School in Milton Keynes

Milton Keynes Village

Milton Keynes Village

Large Format, Monochrome, Places

A place called Home

Copley Woods in Halifax is fairly small, often in deep shade and pretty steep.

To most eyes it probably isn’t particularly beautiful. But for me, nowhere in the world makes me feel more at home.

I have a very personal history with these woods, which at the top are bordered by beautiful giant boulders which my hands know well from what is now more than two decades of clambering.

Silver Birch

Silver Birch

Beer can in crags

Beer can in crags

I have sat here with friends late into the night, professed a first love among these rocks and walked three generations of family dogs along its occasionally cobbled walkways.

Aand now, finally, I have brought the Linhof Super Technika here as well.

It is my quiet place, a place where I can simply be. My Copley Woods.

Imperfectly perfect.

Copley Woods

Copley Woods

Large Format, Places

Linhof Super Technika: Resuming duties

I have missed the excitement of returning home and finding, amongst the bills and the junkmail, that ever so particular thin brown hard-backed envelope lying there on the floor.

Peak Imaging, based in Sheffield, have thankfully not altered their packaging for since my last order with them a few years back. In this age of relentless re-branding and technological advance, it is strangely reassuring.

Contained within are my latest rolls of 120 medium format film, each one expertly slices and diced into two or three frames before being forensically inserted into protective plastic sleeves. One of these films has been laying in hibernation in the fridge for the best part of three years (I only like to send a batch to Peak Imaging).

Forest scene

Forest scene

I’d largely forgotten what was on some of these films. So getting them back was doubly exciting.

Out comes the old Epson 4990 beast of a flat-bed film scanner and off we go.

I’d forgotten what the best settings were, and making an 11in by 14in scan at 1200 dpi.

Without much effort, this creates a 16,000px x 12000px-ish image, which amounts to a 200mb image. So much for digital medium format. Actually, I don’t really mean that – the quality of today’s MF sensors and lenses are extraordinary and I hanker wildly after the new Fuji GFX 50. But in the meantime, the sublime quality offered by my 50-year-old Linhof will keep me more than happy…

Suggestive Stones

Suggestive Stones

West Mersea Beach to Bradwell

West Mersea Beach to Bradwell