Faces of the Airwave Voices

I am a lodger in a radio station.

Yes, I occasionally attempt to translate my projects for telly and/or online into something worth listening to, but most of the time I sit in the middle of a frenetic, creative office watching those around me endeavour to conjure audio gold.

I’ve come to a conclusion: Radio presenters are a funny bunch. I’ve yet to meet a presenter who is an out and out egomaniac. And those you may on first sight suspect are a little full of themselves tend to hide a secret vulnerability and tenderness about them.

What I did not expect, when I was commissioned to do environmental portraits of the entire presenting cast at BBC Essex, was just how many presenters – these people who boldly go one-on-one with the world over the wireless – were intensely camera shy. It has been a joy to team their interests, senses of self and programme, with locations or moods of shoot.

Dave

Dave

Rob Jelly

Rob Jelly

Sadie Nine

Sadie Nine

You might think camera shy = bad news for a photographer. Not at all. I love people who wear their souls on their faces (even if the subjects do not).

Actually, its that last point (the bit in brackets), that I find most interesting. Why do so many of us want to look like George Clooney, have whiter teeth or a slimmer figure? Why is a photograph that shows flaws and imperfections so worrying?

Cath Melandri

Cath Melandri

Tony Fisher

Tony Fisher

Mark

Mark

Personally, and especially in these days of apps that bring re-touching into the hands of all smartphone users, I believe portraits of people as they are have never been more important. And if you can be at the top of your game (and in the public, erm, ear?) and proud of your imperfections then even better.

Peter

Peter

Ollie Winniberg

Ollie Winniberg

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